by Paul Koks in Start Running

Master the 5K: 5 Tips to Get You Ready

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No matter how long you have been running, deciding to run a 5K will be a turning point in your life. The race environment is exhilarating and you have the chance to support a charity that you believe in. Many runners end up addicted to the races and will go on to master longer lengths. That said, mastering the 5K comes first and the following five tips will get you from training to the finish line successfully.

5K Tip #1: Make sure you have a sincere commitment.

This isn’t something you want to do half-hearted. You will need a sincere commitment to your training if you want to be well-trained come race day. You can use quotes and songs that pump you up to get through hard days or those periods of time when you would rather hang out with friends or go to bed early then head out for a run.

Make the commitment. Know what is motivating you to do this. Write your training schedule down so you know what you should be doing each day. Then tap into your personal sources of inspiration to get through the rough spots.

There is nothing that speaks commitment like putting your money out there to sign up for a race. Do this as early as possible so you feel invested in the training process. You now have something to lose if you don’t follow through.

5K Tip #2: Allow gradual process over time.

If you give yourself enough time to train for the race, you shouldn’t feel the pressure to push yourself too hard. Your training schedule should be mixed with longer distances that really push you body to the next level and some shorter runs where you can work on speed or just take it easy at times. The goal is to progress over time so you are ready for the 5K when race day arrives. You don’t need to run 3 miles the first day in training, so give yourself a break.

Monitor your progress by timing your runs at regular intervals during the training phase. Give yourself credit for every bit of progress achieved. As long as you can complete 3.1 miles at least a couple of weeks before race day, you will be just fine. Don’t push yourself too fast or you could end up with injuries or dropping out due to exhaustion.

5K Tip #3: Train for distance before training for speed.

You do need to go into the race having a sense of what your pace should be, but you have to train for distance before you start training for speed. The first step is to make sure you can sustain 3.1 miles and that may take up the majority of your training time. Once you are comfortably completing that distance you can start timing yourself and pushing a little harder to get a faster time.

Ultimately, you should know what your race pace feels like so you are comfortable pushing to the end on race day.

5K Tip #4: Invest in a good pair of running shoes.

As soon as you start training for your first 5K, make the investment in a good pair of running shoes. You will need time to completely break them in so they are supportive and as comfortable as possible. The right shoes can make the difference between a comfortable, exhilarating race experience and an exhausting race day that ends with blisters and sweaty feet with rashes.

You aren’t running a marathon so might not need special socks and expensive running gear, but shoes designed for running are essential. Never buy them new for race day! You have to break them in through training first.

5K Tip #5: Put the race into perspective.

No matter how intimidating you may find the 5K to be, you have to put it in perspective. This is the shortest distance currently raced around the world and it is the starting point for many long distance runners. You may be questioning your ability to make it to the end, but remember it is only 3.1 miles. This is a distance covered in well under an hour and you can always walk at times if you can’t make it to the end running. The end will bring an incredible sense of accomplishment and pride.

Don’t over-estimate the difficulty of the 5K. Remind yourself that it isn’t a long distance and you can comfortably train for it within a few months.




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